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Edfu and Kom Ombo Temples Private Tour From Luxor with Lunch

1 Rating
  • E-Ticket
  • Instant Confirmation
  • Day Trip
  • Private Tour
  • Pickup Service
  • Live Guide
  • 8 hr

At 7:00 am Emo Tour's guide will pick you up from your hotel in Luxor and transfer by Private A/C Vehicle to Edfu around 50 minutes drive south of Luxor . arrival in Edfu where you can visit the majestic Temple of Edfu that dedicated to Horus which is considered by most to be the best preserved cult temple in Egypt. According to the Egyptian myths, it was the place where the falcon-headed god Horus revenged the murder of his father Osiris by killing Seth. Lunch box included. Then Continue Your day tour to Kom Ombo around 45 minutes drive from Eduf Arrival Kom Ombo transfer to see the Temple of Kom Ombo standing on high grounds overlooking The Nile. It differs from other temples because of its double entrance, each one is dedicated to divinity: "Haroeris" with his falcon head and " Sobek " with his crocodile head. The Temple of Kom Ombo was built on the honor of two deities the crocodile-headed Sobek, god of fertility and creator of the world, and Haroeris or the ancient falcon-headed Horus. Also, Kom Ombo's importance lies in its huge sugar-cane. Then around 16:30 pm transfer back to your hotel in Luxor . Private knowledgeable guide will accompany you the whole Tour until returning back to Luxor.

Itinerary Details

This is a typical itinerary for this product

Stop At: Temple of Horus

The Temple of Edfu is an Egyptian temple located on the west bank of the Nile in Edfu, Upper Egypt. The city was known in the Hellenistic period as Koinē Greek: Ἀπόλλωνος πόλις and Latin Apollonopolis Magna, after the chief god Horus, who was identified as Apollo under the interpretatio graeca.

Duration: 2 hour

Stop At: Temple of Kom Ombo

The Temple of Kom Ombo is an unusual double temple in the town of Kom Ombo in Aswan Governorate, Upper Egypt. It was constructed during the Ptolemaic dynasty, 180–47 BC. Some additions to it were later made during the Roman period

Duration: 2 hour