Availability for booking new reservations is currently limited due to coronavirus and WHO guidelines.

Loch Ness,Culloden Battlefield,Cawdor Castle & Much More From Inverness City

1 Rating
  • E-Ticket
  • Instant Confirmation
  • Day Trip
  • Private Tour
  • Pickup Service
  • Live Guide

Whether you are looking for 1 day tours from Inverness or simply trying to take in as many of the beautiful sights as possible on your Highland adventure, our Loch Ness tour from Inverness is sure to captivate like no other. Our friendly local guide will pick you up from your place of stay and take you on a tour to remember around some of the most famous, historic and culturally significant From Inverness we will travel to Loch Ness, home of the romantic and brooding Urquhart Castle (as well as a certain legendary monster!) The tour then turns towards the historic Beauly Priory, before arriving at the Glen Ord Distillery, one of the last remaining single malt scotch whisky distilleries on the Black Isle. Take in the historic and dramatic Culloden Battlefield and Clava Cairns, before heading for nearby Cawdor Castle. Round off your tour in Inverness with St. Andrew’s Cathedral and Ness Islands, before being dropped off at your place of stay. What are you waiting for Book now with us

Itinerary Details

This is a typical itinerary for this product

Stop At: Loch Ness Region

From your place of stay in Inverness we will travel towards Loch Ness, with plenty of opportunities for photos at some of the most beautiful vantage points the loch has to offer. From there we move towards the famous Urquhart Castle and its visitor centre. The castle is a truly romantic ruin, perched on a rocky outcrop overlooking the loch, and surrounded on all sides by waters over 600-feet deep, where the legendary Loch Ness Monster is said to make her home. Take your time wandering the historic ruins and learn more about its amazing history, before the tour picks up again, this time towards Beauly Priory, a beautiful ancient monastery that now lies in ruins but retains an air of reverence and mystery.

Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Urquhart Castle

High above the murky, deep waters of Loch Ness is Urquhart Castle – perhaps the most iconic sights available around the loch. The castle has ancient Pictish origins, with the land once being the site of a 5th Century fort. Now in ruins, Urquhart Castle as we know it today was built and rebuilt over the centuries until in the 16th century it was repaired and remodelled by the Grants, a powerful Highland family. The castle has changed hands more times than history can keep up with, and been the site of many bloody battles – indeed part of it was blown up at some point in 1690 to prevent its usage by Jacobite forces, the large pieces of masonry still visible beside what remains of the gatehouse. What is there to do at Urquhart Castle? Although Urquhart Castle is a ruin, it has been preserved and made safe by extensive work from Historic Environment Scotland, who have installed several replicas from the medieval period, including a giant wooden trebuchet.

Duration: 1 hour

Stop At: Beauly Priory

The ruins of Beauly Priory lie at the east end the main square of Beauly. It was one of three priories founded in Scotland by monks of the Valliscaulian order, from the Burgundy region of France, in the years following 1230. The monks clearly liked what they found when they arrived, for Beauly was referred to in the 1230s as Prioratus de Bello Loco: Latin for "Priory of the Lovely Spot". This suggests that the name Beauly, from the French beau lieu or "beautiful place" dates back far beyond the popular belief that it was based on a comment made by Mary Queen of Scots during her visit in the summer of 1564.

Duration: 40 minutes

Stop At: Glen Ord Distillery

From Beauly Priory it’s a short journey to Glen Ord Distillery, a traditional distillery that boasts its own maltings and uses barley and water sourced from the local environment. Learn about the traditional distilling processes refined over hundreds of years. Local folk have been making whisky here in Muir of Ord for hundreds of years, but it was Thomas Mackenzie of Ord who founded a legal distillery in 1838 to create local jobs and provide a ready market for local grain. For generations Glen Ord was a secret delight among those who know its charm and because it is so sought after all of the Singleton of Glen Ord is exported to South East Asia. Before our tours picks up again, this time east towards Culloden Battlefield and Visitor Centre.

Duration: 45 minutes

Stop At: Culloden Battlefield

Culloden famously played host to the bloody Battle of Culloden, the outcome of which had ramifications far outside the local area and is intensively documented at the visitor centre. Get up close and personal with the history of the battle with artefacts, re-enactments and talks by local historians. On 16 April 1746, the final Jacobite Rising came to a brutal head. Jacobite supporters, seeking to restore the Stuart monarchy to the British thrones, gathered to fight the Duke of Cumberland's government troops. It was the last pitched battle on British soil and, in less than an hour, around 1,500 men were slain – more than 1,000 of them Jacobites. The richly researched, stimulating and sensitive Culloden Visitor Centre, which stands beside the battlefield, features artefacts from both sides of the battle and interactive displays that reveal the background to the conflict. It stands as a monument and a guide to a pivotal day in history. Discover how a bloody fight that lasted only an hour changed life in the Highlands forever.

Duration: 1 hour

Stop At: Clava Cairns

This deeply sacred place within the landscape of the Highlands is steeped in history, with the first usage of the site thought to date back over 4000 years. Set within a beautiful forested area, there is evidence that ancient peoples returned here again and again; there are even the ruins of a medieval chapel here. The Clava Cairns serves as the inspiration for the fictitious Craigh na Dun standing stones in the book and TV series Outlander, in fact, the famous “cleft stone” that transports the main character Claire back in time can be found here. Clava Cairns or the Prehistoric Burial Cairns of Balnuaran of Clava are a group of three Bronze Age cairns located near Inverness. A hugely significant and exceptionally well preserved prehistoric site, Clava Cairns is a fantastic example of the distant history of Highland Scotland.

Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Cawdor Castle

Opens from 9th April, 2020. From Clava Cairns, it is just a short drive towards Cawdor Castle. We will spend around 1 hour here. Take some time to wander the beautiful walled gardens and natural woodlands while taking in the castle’s extensive history dating back as far as 1180. The castle is a popular destination and a must-see, not least for its connection to the Shakespeare play Macbeth. Located about 5 miles south west of Nairn, Cawdor Castle was built around a 15th century tower house which originally belonged to Clan Cawdor before passing into the hands of Campbells in the 16th century. According to legend, the castle is built around a thorn tree, which has since been identified as a holly dating from 1372, which visitors can still see today in the dungeon. Experience the castle’s sumptuous interior and see the impressive Drawing Room, its wall adorned with portraits of generations of Campbells, the Tapestry Bedroom with its precious wall hangings, the Dining Room with its magnificent stone fireplace and the Old Kitchen which retains its 19th century range and an array of antique cooking implements.

Duration: 1 hour

Stop At:

St Andrew’s Cathedral, also known as Inverness Cathedral, is a beautiful cathedral church dating back to 1869, located near the centre of Inverness. The Anglican Cathedral is the most northerly in the UK, and is an excellent example of local architecture and the Gothic style. Take some time to admire the beautiful stained glass windows, intricately carved stonework and views across the river. The main Cathedral is open every day for visitors to view, quietly reflect and pray if they wish. Choral services and community events are also held here, including the occasional wedding. Services are held in English and occasionally Scottish Gaelic. The Cathedral is popular with visitors because of its convenient location in the city. There are some amenities available including a shop selling local crafts and a small cafe where visitors can sit down and enjoy a coffee and sample one of the delicious homemade cakes.

Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: Ness Islands

The River Ness is the river that runs from the northern end of Loch Ness, through Loch Dochfour and through the heart of the City of Inverness – in fact the river is where Inverness gets it’s name, not from the famous Loch Ness as many think, but from the Scottish Gaelic: Inbhir Nis, meaning “Mouth of the River Ness”. According to the legend the first-ever claimed sighting of the Loch Ness monster wasn’t in Loch Ness, but the River Ness; when Saint Columba is said to have banished a “water monster” back into the river after it tried to attack one of his disciples who was swimming across. The river is a draw to visitors – many buildings sit attractively on its banks, including St. Andrew’s Cathedral (Inverness Cathedral), Eden Court Theatre and a number of popular restaurants and hotels. Nature-lovers should keep an eye out for common and grey seals, a number of bat species, and birds such as dippers, goosander and the occasional osprey.

Duration: 30 minutes